Private Training

Discussion in 'GOALKEEPER Forum' started by Oski, Apr 24, 2018.

  1. Oski

    Oski Bronze

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    I've suddenly become a sports agent/manager/chauffer/nutritionist for an up and coming B08 keeper.

    Free keeper training provided by the club seems good, but focuses on blocking shots. Not much, if any, time is spent on positioning, when/how to come out of goal, distributing the ball, etc.

    What kinds of private training have people found helpful? Starting at what age? How frequent? How expensive? Any recommendations in the San Gabriel Valley or North Orange County areas?
     
  2. MWN

    MWN Silver Elite

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    My best advice is get your hands on the NSCAA Goalkeeper DVDs.
    https://www.amazon.com/Soccer-Goalkeeper-Training-DVD-Set/dp/B00AB6K4OK

    Sit down and watch them with your kid. Appreciate, these are targeted at coaching coaches, BUT are also well suited for any kid with the appropriate attention span and desire to understand the how and whys.

    At $50 is the cost of a single private lesson (in most places).

    Next, after spending hours watching the videos and rewatching the chapters that are especially relevant, go find a coach in your area.
     
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  3. NorCal

    NorCal Bronze

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  4. Grace T.

    Grace T. Silver

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    There isn't a set US curriculum, which is part of the problem (there isn't an agreement either on what keepers should be doing and what style they should be using, which is also part of the problem). I second the NSCAA goalkeeper tapes, but think they are more appropriate for a slightly older keeper (who can understand the subtleties), and aren't much help for a parent or non-GK coach (who may not understand the very little subtleties of GK errors and development) beyond the basics. Last I checked too, the US Soccer GK license still didn't make sense (they don't let you get one until you have a B field license) and coaches get very little training on goalkeeping in the licensing curriculum. Our old club had 4 keeper coaches in 1 year....1 of them if my son's old field trainer who is a very good trainer but never played keeper...only 1 of the 4 was an actual keep that had played college.

    Of the good trainers out there, my son's mostly focuses on the basics which he considers: 1) the back pass, 2) catching and 3) diving (in that order of priority). They've also done a little high ball/defending the cross, throw distribution, positioning and tactics, and talking. Only got to the one v one at month 6. Only had 10 minutes and 1 session of the punt. But mostly it's the basics basics basics over and over again. He charges $140/hour but my son has a training partner that reduces the cost. Beyond that I think it's important to take with a variety of trainers and camps (yeah, I know some people say [me included] camps aren't any good because you never know what you are going to get and once your keeper learns something they may not reinforce with practice, but keepers are an exception) so the kid can make up his mind on particular techniques and style (for example my son picked up his k-stop technique at the LA Galaxy keeper camp and one v one tactics at the workshops Jeff Tackett did this year).
     
  5. Grace T.

    Grace T. Silver

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    p.s. if you are out in SGV and don't mind driving out to Claremont, Tackett teaches out there....he's more about strategic keeping than anything, which sounds like what you are looking for....my son hasn't done core/basics with him yet (we keep meaning to go out but it's far even for a Sunday drive). For his tactics workshops, he has people come as far from Vegas and San Diego for them.
     
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  6. GKMomma

    GKMomma Bronze

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    There are 2 very good goalkeeper trainers that I recommend. Joe out of Impact Goalkeeper Academy if you live closer to SB/ Huntington Beach area, or Tackett if you live closer to the Inland Empire area. In my opinion, I believe that GK camps are worth the money. Your best bet honestly, would be to set up a session with each of them, to see who your son connects with the most. Good Luck!
     
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  7. Oski

    Oski Bronze

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    Thanks for the recommendations.

    But at what age do most keepers get a private trainer? And how frequently do they attend? And are we talking individual or group sessions? I'd really like to know at what age your keeper started with private training, whether you found it helpful/not helpful, and whether you'd do anything different in retrospect.

    Are 8 year old keepers finding twice-a-week private sessions a worthwhile investment, or are most people waiting until age 10 and doing once a month? Or something else?
     
  8. Grace T.

    Grace T. Silver

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    My son takes once a week with the private trainer in a dual session, and once a week with the club trainer in spring/fall, and in summer/winter he takes a semi-private with his old field trainer...he usually has futsal or a game during the rest of the year once a week and trainings 2x a week with the team so that's already soccer 5/7 days days he usually has, which IMO is enough at his age (9). I don't want to saturate him with it that he begins to hate it. He generally takes dual lessons with one other kid because it helps his focus, the competition pushes him, and it helps with the cost. I think Tackett does groups of 4...small groups or duals generally help unless you are doing the core basics because an exercise might look like this for example and you need more than just the coach and keeper to execute it: RB defender backpasses it to the keeper who swings it to the other side; LB defender loses it to opposing mid; opposing mid crosses to the striker (coach); keeper runs, yells "no shot", sets in ready position; coach either takes the shot or goes inside the 18 and keeper needs to determine to come out and smother, take space, or sit on the arc and block (5 people need for this exercise including the keeper and coach, everyone except the coach rotates to help out and watch the others and learn from their mistakes).

    A lot of it depends on 1) what's the level of training he's receiving at the club already and do you need to supplement it, 2) what are your ambitions, 3) where's he at in his development in comparison to others and could he benefit from it, 4) what else does he have on his plate, 5) do you subscribe to the school that he should be developing his field skills too at this age (in which case he's already doing 2 sports, but you just haven't realized it yet) or is he all in as a keeper, among other things. Lot's of questions which are hard to answer without knowing your son and his ambitions.
     
  9. Mystery Train

    Mystery Train Silver

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    My experience, for what it's worth:

    My daughter went from AYSO to club just before she turned 10. From 8-9, I just trained her whenever she asked me to take her to the field or the day before a big game. Her club had weekly keeper training which she started at 9. It was free and the coach was very good. But yes, it was ALL shot blocking and basic physical technique (scooping, catching and footwork and eventually diving). I wanted to give her more (kicking, 1v1, punting, distribution, defending set pieces, etc.) but her GK coach chastised me because his philosophy was to build her over the long haul, and did not want me to clutter her head with tactics at a young age. He believes that keepers lose their instincts if they over think, so he was very protective of her. So I let go and let him do his thing. She went on to another club, but retained him as her keeper coach ever since, going on 7 years now. We started paying for his services around u13/14. Once a week, 1.5 hours, small group training, around $40 per session. It's worked out well for her. She's done other keeper training to supplement here and there, but has stayed with the one coach consistently as her core training. Her latest club has a good keeper coach and does 1/2 of one of her normal practices with that coach. But it is difficult to involve more coaches because everyone has different styles and technique, and if you bounce around, it can confuse the kid.

    My younger son (9) has shown interest in playing keeper, but we're waiting before putting him in club. Our plan is to play AYSO until he either moves on to other interests or shows a real passion for soccer, and at that point introduce him to weekly keeper training. There is a constant rush to specialize earlier and earlier in youth sports, but I really believe you have more time than you think. Waiting until after 12 or 13 (puberty) might be too long a wait, but 10 isn't too late to start IMHO.
     
  10. Keepermom2

    Keepermom2

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    My daughter went from JUSA to club (her first club team was more like a Signature team) at 8/9 years old when it was clear she wasn't challenged in recreational soccer (the last year played in rec. I was the coach so maybe that was the problem. I was the only one dumb enough to show up to discuss who was going to coach the team. I would put her as goalkeeper for 3/4ths of the game and then forward to score). I knew something had to change. Having said that, I started taking her to training sessions (not religiously) at $20 a session when she was about 7 so she could learn proper footwork, passing, and kicking. There she would dabble in the goal too if she felt like it. At 9 years old I would get really mad at her lack of effort at Keeper training because I wasted my time which is so precious. At 10 years old, she was all in when it was a good trainer and hated when training was over. She is now 11. I think you have to let your child be the guide on whether they have enough passion to make it worth the time and money.
     
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  11. Eagle33

    Eagle33 Silver

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    Over the years I learned that every goalkeeper trainer is different and if you are able to find a good one, hold on to him/her as long as you can.
    My kid was lucky enough to have a great keeper coach when he was 11-12. He was very technical and my boy learned a lot in a very short period of time. About 4 years ago this keeper coach was offered a spot to play internationally and he left the States. I tried everyone available locally in South Orange county (didn't have an option to drive far), but could not find anyone even remotely close to what this guy was.
    He still comes once in while to visit his folks and whenever he is here in Cali, my kid is still getting a session or two with him. I wish it would be more trainers like him - true professionals who care.
     
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  12. MyDaughtersAKeeper

    MyDaughtersAKeeper

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    In response to your questions: As early as you can get the kid going. As often as they can attend. Both group & private. My kid started keeper lessons at the end of her first year in competitive (she became a keeper as no-one else wanted to & got invited to play up for a team that was going to state cup). Lessons are very helpful.

    Get them going as early as you can as often as you, with the caveat that they are having fun, and enjoying the work. Whether this is alone or with a group is up the kid (my kid likes 1 on 1 sessions). Make sure the kid continues to work on field skills; play on a rec team, arena team, play futsal. All is ok IF your kid is having fun and developing. The road to being a keeper is a long and lonely road at times. Make sure they want it. Good luck.
     
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  13. pewpew

    pewpew Silver

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    @Grace T.
    I'm hoping that was a typo earlier..$140 per session?!?! Even if you split it with another GK $70 per hour is ridiculous. Especially for youngers. I concur with the reccomendations for Jeff Tackett or Big Joe at IGA. Depending where you leave see if there's a nearby junior college or university where the goalkeepers might be interested in training a young protege. That's how we found one of our first trainers. Using the practice fields at a local college. I was working with my kid. Young college kid walks by and asks if we'd like help training. Says he's the starter there. Those couple of years with him were some of the best ever. Super nice kid. $15hr. But we gave him $20. Sessions started running 90mins so we gave him $25 though he never asked for more. He loved training my kid and we treated him like a stepson of sorts. He was here from another country. No family here. Just teammates. We'd give him extra money on his birthday. Xmas time we bought him gloves. Not cheap ones either. I told my wife we are spending more on his gloves than we do for 4 or 5 family members combined. She said go for it. And any other time we could help him. He eventually graduated and moved on with his career but we still text from time to time to see how things are.
     
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  14. Grace T.

    Grace T. Silver

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    Month 7...trainer today introduces the long goal kick. Slight correction in his technique for where he's hitting and pointing his toe. Gave him homework to work on.
     
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  15. Grace T.

    Grace T. Silver

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    All I can tell you is he is worth every penny, and we couldn't afford it otherwise without a training partner, but I would walk away from any club that would require us to give him up. He is a wizard. Small example: he fixed my sons punting in 10 minutes (next practice, he shows up and is able to punt with golden boy rival keeper to the horror of the coaches).

    My son had 5 trainers at his old club. The first was the Doc. She was good with the basics (diving, conditioning, high balls) but had a very old school of thought (low catches with an outstretched leg, no forward dives, no kstops, goalkeeper tight on their lines, punting is important and to be used with right hand). The second and fourth were nice guys, understood the basics. The third was a college goalkeeper (division 3), but inexperienced as a coach (she never done it before)...still had a great knowledge base and we did some privates with her for $40 before my son was old enough to sign on with his trainer...we were sad when they let her go but she didn't improve my sons game as much as the wizard has (and I think that was part of the problem...the coaches weren't expecting the wizard would fix things that were wrong not because of his skills but because he had been taught improperly some little details by everyone including myself). The fifth is his old field trainer...great field trainer, great guy, never played goalkeeper though and misses some subtleties though picked up a lot from my son's trainer. That's why we have the wizard and happily pay the split rate.
     
  16. Woobie06

    Woobie06

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    Hi, just curious who the trainer you are working with and where is he located? Sounds interesting. Thanks.
     
  17. ForumParent

    ForumParent Bronze

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    Same question, Grace T. Message me if you prefer not to post (and remind me—you are OCish, right?). As much as the price makes me dizzy, perhaps we find someone to double up with as well.
     
  18. Keeper pops

    Keeper pops Bronze

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    At early age and if your kid wants to be a keeper. First It’s important to look for a club with excellent & dedicated keeper coach. My 03 DD had great keeper trainers from the club starting at a young age.
    If your looking for extra trading & your willing to drive 1/2 or so, I recommend these coaches & not in any order cuz I respect these coaches and have made an impact on my 03 and now my 08.

    - Frank Bustos is a Mt Sac keeper coach and does training there.
    - Miguel Bautista is the new Legends Keeper coach. With his transition, hope he plans to have extra training sessions outside the club
    - Big Joe Velasco in the South Bay. He is awesome, intense and does training week nights and weekends.
    - Jeff Tackett in Claremont area. I take both my girls to his Sunday session as schedule permits (it’s tough) also have class sessions which is a great learning process.

    These gents are awesome and adds different dimension to complete a keeper.
     
  19. socalkdg

    socalkdg Silver

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    Anyone do ariel training at the beach? I assume it is practicing your dives on the sand.
     
  20. cheaper2keeper

    cheaper2keeper Bronze

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    Like coach Tackett, especially for the mental aspects of the position.

    I also really like coach Jerome that trains at Pomona Pitzer. Not for the faint of heart. He will work your keeper for a full 90 minutes.
     
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