Right footed left back

Surf Zombie

SILVER ELITE
My dd’s Team has three outside backs who split time between left and right back (3-3-2 9 v. 9), my kid included. All three are right footed

Any of you have experience with a right footed player playing left back? Just curious how it’s going and anything to look for.
 
IMHO - I’d say forget over analyzing it and see it as a great opportunity for your DD to learn to play with her left and get strong with it. Heck, if she’s already solid on the right side, I’d offer her to play the left side the whole time.
 
My dd’s Team has three outside backs who split time between left and right back (3-3-2 9 v. 9), my kid included. All three are right footed

Any of you have experience with a right footed player playing left back? Just curious how it’s going and anything to look for.
Doesn't matter.
 

SocalPapa

SILVER ELITE
A right-footed left back has the advantage facing a winger cutting inside toward the goal. The reverse is true for a left-footed back playing on the right. Hopefully either would soon become strong enough on the weaker foot to make any tackle/pass/clear necessary for the position. Backs don't have time to adjust to a favored foot.
 

Surfref

PREMIER
I agree with Espola, doesn't matter. Learn to play with both feet because they will need to have equal skill levels with both feet.

Get a rebounder/kickback and set it up in the backyard and have your kid practice kicking and trapping with the left foot only. Set up a lawn chair and toss the ball (5-6 feet away) to your kid and have them control the left footed touch as they kick it back to your hands. Do these two things every non-practice day for a couple of months and she will quickly be using her left foot almost as well as her right. Once she can control and deliver a crisp and accurate pass on the ground, go find a good trainer for 3-4 sessions to tweak her left foot medium to long distance kicking mechanics. Problem solved.
 
A right-footed left back has the advantage facing a winger cutting inside toward the goal. The reverse is true for a left-footed back playing on the right. Hopefully either would soon become strong enough on the weaker foot to make any tackle/pass/clear necessary for the position. Backs don't have time to adjust to a favored foot.
All players should work every practice to strengthen the un-favored foot.
 
My righty son played left back most of the season last year. It's harder to put in crosses when you venture forward, but easier to cut inside and shoot. You need to be able to defend equally in both directions anyway and passing (and putting the ball out) with either foot shouldn't be an issue.
 
My dd’s Team has three outside backs who split time between left and right back (3-3-2 9 v. 9), my kid included. All three are right footed

Any of you have experience with a right footed player playing left back? Just curious how it’s going and anything to look for.
I would say it is an honor to be the right footed player to be asked to play left back.
 

SocalPapa

SILVER ELITE
Here's an interesting article on the evolution of the use of right-footed left backs in Europe. It says it became more common as wing tactics changed (with wingers cutting in more often instead of just driving to deep positions to make a cross). The drawback they note is some of these backs aren't able to deliver crosses on the attack without switching to their right. (The same issue @focomoso identified above.) http://www.thefalse9.com/2016/07/evolution-right-footed-leftback.html
 

Bickrick

BRONZE
Agree with some of the others. Easier to cut in and get a clean shot off. Harder to deliver clean consistent crosses. My son has played left back for a couple years and is right footed. Consistency is the hardest part of the crosses. Going full speed against a good defender still causes him to deliver a subpar cross more often than if he were on the right side. Just work with them on it, and do not promote switching feet to cross, no matter how bad they are initially.
 

Sons of Pitches

SILVER ELITE
My dd is right footed. Played left back from age 7 to 12. Really helped her develop her left foot. Now at 15 plays right back and can play well with both feet.

All of the comments are spot on. The crosses off a speed dribble or long run are particularly difficult with the week foot. The balls that come as passes or pop out and you are looking to center are a bit easier.

Leave your dd out on the left. Later it will pay dividends if and when she is on a higher level team with a natural lefty
 

46n2

SILVER ELITE
The only concern anyone should have is when their kid CAN'T use their left....:eek:.
Personally if they cant use their left , leave them in that position so they can learn too......
Kids that cant use their left foot, stick out like a kid that still toe punches the ball or dribbles to the corner with their head down...
 
My DD could not use her left foot to save her life when she joined her current team at 10 years old. Her coach put her at left back and it forced her to develop her left foot. Now at 14 she has no problem passing, dribbling, shooting, etc. with her left and has the benefit of cutting in and shooting with her right. Aside from the benefit of developing her left foot, she usually has the task of chasing down the best forward on the opposing team which has made her a great defender. As an outside back her coach expects her to attack more, which she has improved on as well. The benefits over the long run greatly outweigh the setbacks you may be experiencing now.
 

zebrafish

SILVER ELITE
My kid has played primarily on left side for the past few years and was put there because she had the best left foot on her team, even though it was still the weaker one for her. I welcomed this.
Agree with everyone that developing both feet is really important. At this point, my kid is equal footed.
From a strategic point of view, you want to be able to go either way with the ball no matter where you are playing-- offense, midfield, or defense.
To me, it seems crippling to only be able to go one direction

So I would use your kid being put on the left side as a motivator and way for them to focus effort on strengthening their left foot. It will definitely pay dividends.
 

Surf Zombie

SILVER ELITE
I posted this a couple years ago when my DD was playing U11 (9 v.9) and was splitting time with a couple other girls rotating between LB & RB. All three are right footed. Had some concerns about the whole right footed left back and where it would lead.

Fast forward a couple years to U13 and she is playing almost full time at left back for her ECNL team. She is still “right footed” but after working hard at it for a couple seasons you can’t tell much difference between her stronger right foot and “weaker” left foot. Really worked out to be a blessing in disguise.

Not sure what made me think of this post, but if any one else’s U-little finds herself being asked to play a similar role, there are definite benefits to embracing the challenge.
 
A few years back, my DD was placed at left back for 7vs7 and it was the best thing the coach did for her. He encouraged her to only use left foot and now (at 11vs11) she is comfortable using both feet can play both left or right back without any hesitation or concern!

My dd’s Team has three outside backs who split time between left and right back (3-3-2 9 v. 9), my kid included. All three are right footed

Any of you have experience with a right footed player playing left back? Just curious how it’s going and anything to look for.
 
I posted this a couple years ago when my DD was playing U11 (9 v.9) and was splitting time with a couple other girls rotating between LB & RB. All three are right footed. Had some concerns about the whole right footed left back and where it would lead.

Fast forward a couple years to U13 and she is playing almost full time at left back for her ECNL team. She is still “right footed” but after working hard at it for a couple seasons you can’t tell much difference between her stronger right foot and “weaker” left foot. Really worked out to be a blessing in disguise.

Not sure what made me think of this post, but if any one else’s U-little finds herself being asked to play a similar role, there are definite benefits to embracing the challenge.
My oldest is right footed and has been asked to play left back over the last several years. This is not her natural position (center back) but from it has developed a proficient left. Feel this has been invaluable and given the coaching staff a player who can play anywhere along the backline.
 
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