Recruiting Tips for Parents Just Starting the Process

I love this stuff, thanks bro. My dd needs the right fit. 3 official visits coming soon to a campus near you except by EOTL's crib....lol. I spoke to a big time youth coach and he told me 2021s are still up first. 2022s need to slow the heck down and not fret is what he told me. Relax and calm down was his message to me to tell of of you. Relax everyone :) Take your time, especially in these times. That's my 4 cents worth :)
One of the key things is your players discussion on how new players are brought into the program what their expectation are for playing time, training, development and the time frames.

Current roster is a tricky one but does fit in to the discussions. What positions have the most opportunities? Being capable of playing multiples does helps a lot in section and eventually finding playing time.

Some coaches flat out told my son that freshmen league play is a long shot, some preseason but when you look at the major conference teams it's mostly juniors and seniors getting the minutes.

Larger close to 30 persons roster make it real competition for those minutes. Is your player prepared to sit for 1-2 years before getting major minutes?
 
The whole process is not really about soccer but about your kid's education and college experience. Your kid is not going pro and if they do, they are better off getting a job since there is no money to be made in the pro's (except for the very, very few). Every girl that gets recruited is a good player but not all freshmen last on the team. I would be surprised if 75% of college players make it all 4 years. Playing time is definitely a challenge with 11 starting spots and often 30+ players. Make sure you kid is getting the degree they want. That the school fits the experience they want and that they like their teammates and develop friendships at the school. If they play or make an impact that should be a bonus not a deciding factor.
 
If I understand the transfer window, it could be that your underclassmen is getting playing time, making an impact and then overnight three or four upperclassmen transfer in and underclassmen are back on the bench...

is that about right? If so, @Simisoccerfan is absolutely right on the button.
 

msoccerm

SILVER
The whole process is not really about soccer but about your kid's education and college experience. Your kid is not going pro and if they do, they are better off getting a job since there is no money to be made in the pro's (except for the very, very few). Every girl that gets recruited is a good player but not all freshmen last on the team. I would be surprised if 75% of college players make it all 4 years. Playing time is definitely a challenge with 11 starting spots and often 30+ players. Make sure you kid is getting the degree they want. That the school fits the experience they want and that they like their teammates and develop friendships at the school. If they play or make an impact that should be a bonus not a deciding factor.
If this is the case why not just go to university and not play a sport which takes up study time and a chance to have a part time job which will help you get a real job. All the money spent from travelling to tournaments and private coaching to get that college scholarship was such a waste of money which could have been spent on college. And parents could have done something more productive with their kids instead of sitting in a car e.g. volunteered or camped. And parents are willing to put their kid at risk of getting an injury that may require surgery ($) and rehab ($) which would affect their mental health and have life long symptoms (osteoarthritis) - for what? Of course they want to play on their college team. Sitting on a bench does nothing for your child's confidence and mental health.

I feel like your idea of women's pro sports is outdated. All around the world pro female players are making a living out there, having a great time and getting university degrees. At a much greater level than players in college they are learning valuable skills - leadership, resilience, team work, handling pressure, etc. so that when they "retire" they can get a good paying job. With no regrets. It is easier than you think for a female to get a pro contract in Europe or Asia. People play soccer professionally because they LOVE it. Kind of like musicians, artists, ministers, actors, teachers, etc It's not all about the money.

What are Americans doing to help professional womens soccer grow in the US? Are getting your company to sponsor teams? Volunteering? Buying tickets and going to semi pro/pro games with your friends?
 

CaliKlines

Well-Known Member
If I understand the transfer window, it could be that your underclassmen is getting playing time, making an impact and then overnight three or four upperclassmen transfer in and underclassmen are back on the bench...
Bingo....my DD made it to the Sweet 16 of the NCAA tournament as a freshman...started, and played the entire 90 mins against a dominant UCLA side. However, due to the overall success of the team in the tournament, the coach was able to recruit transfer players from Europe which drastically impacted her minutes in her sophomore season. Dog eat dog daily competition on the pitch at all levels. I agree with cerebro, lots of routes to playing in college, so you do what you can to help the player get seen. ID Camps, guesting, playing up, sending emails, working hard to improve skills, conditioning. My DD guested with a team from Seattle at November Nights (I think) and some college coaches from the Seattle area were there to scout that team and afterwards, the club coach fielded some inquiries regarding my daughter. One size does not fit all.
 

msoccerm

SILVER
D1 is not a big deal now that I've seen and experienced it. Honestly my daughter would have been perfectly happy playing at the D3 level.
If my daughter was academic I would be for sure looking at a school with smaller class sizes and group based discussions - most Div 3 and some Div 2 schools. Californians aside - not sure why Americans always go for those big state schools - University of Arkansas is ranked #2 in womens soccer, but in the 1,000 in the QS rankings. That's just awful. And I'm sure the class sizes are like 100+.
 

Dubs

GOLD
If my daughter was academic I would be for sure looking at a school with smaller class sizes and group based discussions - most Div 3 and some Div 2 schools. Californians aside - not sure why Americans always go for those big state schools - University of Arkansas is ranked #2 in womens soccer, but in the 1,000 in the QS rankings. That's just awful. And I'm sure the class sizes are like 100+.
That is precisely why school fit always comes first. These girls need to ask themselves if they would be happy at these places if soccer is taken out of the equation.
 

msoccerm

SILVER
That is precisely why school fit always comes first. These girls need to ask themselves if they would be happy at these places if soccer is taken out of the equation.
They probably would be happy if the party scene was good and there was a lot of school pride because that's what some state schools have to do to attract people. Otherwise if you look at big picture you're sending your child to a school where learning is based on listening and memorising and there are no prospects or internships (except maybe medical/nursing) within a reasonable distance.

Stanford QS 2
UCLA QS 36
University of CA - Davis QS 112
University of CA - Irving QS 210
University Notre Dame QS 211
University of Florida State QS 456
University of Oklahoma QS 651-700
University of Arkansas QS 1001+
 

GT45

SILVER ELITE
They probably would be happy if the party scene was good and there was a lot of school pride because that's what some state schools have to do to attract people. Otherwise if you look at big picture you're sending your child to a school where learning is based on listening and memorising and there are no prospects or internships (except maybe medical/nursing) within a reasonable distance.

Stanford QS 2
UCLA QS 36
University of CA - Davis QS 112
University of CA - Irving QS 210
University Notre Dame QS 211
University of Florida State QS 456
University of Oklahoma QS 651-700
University of Arkansas QS 1001+
This is not an accurate comment at all. Large schools also have small classes. Large schools offer great educations. Many large schools are in or very near large cities. You may be referring to Arkansas in particular, but to say they do not have job prospects or internships within a reasonable distance is quite an assumption. Same with this comment "learning is based on listening and memorising". How would you know that? I take it you have never attended a large school.
 

msoccerm

SILVER
I would think that lecture-based classes are fine for some, but it requires a pretty good attention span and engaging professors.

Apologies if it looks like I'm knocking University of Arkansas because it looks like an affordable school, but the local internship possibilities are bleak:

Looks like you only went to schools with large classes sizes because it looks like you're not capable of researching, analysing and listening to other's opinions. lol
 

GT45

SILVER ELITE
Large schools do have small classes too. Thank you for the link to major employers, but I am not sure what that proves. You ignore the rest of my message. Your post was based on assumptions and inaccuracies about large schools. I pointed that out.
 

GT45

SILVER ELITE
Of course sunshine - large schools have small classes, but mainly large classes and sometimes classes that are only offered online.
You started this conversation with a pompous dig at large schools. Now you end it calling me sunshine. Your shallowness is evident in your posts. Small schools sometimes have classes online too. You don't like large classes. You need your hand held. We get it. Some people thrive in big cities, others do not. To each his/her own. I would never go to a small school. It is not me. But, I find no need to take a dig at them when I have never attended one, nor am I naive enough to put all small schools in the same box.
 
You started this conversation with a pompous dig at large schools. Now you end it calling me sunshine. Your shallowness is evident in your posts. Small schools sometimes have classes online too. You don't like large classes. You need your hand held. We get it. Some people thrive in big cities, others do not. To each his/her own. I would never go to a small school. It is not me. But, I find no need to take a dig at them when I have never attended one, nor am I naive enough to put all small schools in the same box.
I generally do not get involved but you did take a dig ("you need your hand held"). I went to big schools but my kids are at smaller schools. They would do fine at either, but I have to say I had no conception of how incredible the small school experience could be until seeing my kids attend them. I had tons of large auditorium classes, they have almost none. No is holding their hands, yet the professor interaction and career support is phenomenal. To each his/her own, just skip the digs, please.
 
If this is the case why not just go to university and not play a sport which takes up study time and a chance to have a part time job which will help you get a real job. All the money spent from travelling to tournaments and private coaching to get that college scholarship was such a waste of money which could have been spent on college. And parents could have done something more productive with their kids instead of sitting in a car e.g. volunteered or camped. And parents are willing to put their kid at risk of getting an injury that may require surgery ($) and rehab ($) which would affect their mental health and have life long symptoms (osteoarthritis) - for what? Of course they want to play on their college team. Sitting on a bench does nothing for your child's confidence and mental health.

I feel like your idea of women's pro sports is outdated. All around the world pro female players are making a living out there, having a great time and getting university degrees. At a much greater level than players in college they are learning valuable skills - leadership, resilience, team work, handling pressure, etc. so that when they "retire" they can get a good paying job. With no regrets. It is easier than you think for a female to get a pro contract in Europe or Asia. People play soccer professionally because they LOVE it. Kind of like musicians, artists, ministers, actors, teachers, etc It's not all about the money.

What are Americans doing to help professional womens soccer grow in the US? Are getting your company to sponsor teams? Volunteering? Buying tickets and going to semi pro/pro games with your friends?
I feel like you are naive. Regarding going pro there are around 333 D1 women's soccer programs and about 9500 players at those schools. Maybe 40 per year go pro. That's a 1% chance to make it. For those that do great they get to continue their passion but the other 99% of D1 players won't go pro. They will have to deal with transfers and younger players taking their playing time. Thus they should pick the college that gives them the best overall experience and the chance to get the education they want. If soccer can help pay for this education that is about the most any parent can hope for. Regarding your first paragraph, I totally disagree with you. My other two kids played but not in college. The entire experience including those long car drives are great memories and they learned valuable skills that they continue to use.
 
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