How is home school coming along?

blam

SILVER
We started off good, clocking in about 5 hours per day beginning of the week. Now it is down to just 2 hours a day. Discipline is waning. Anyone else have this problem?
 

Emma

SILVER
No, but I do admire your strong start. We didn't start off as strong. Gave the kids some time to adapt to the new situation and deal with the emotional toll this took on them. Once they started getting restless, we asked them to put together a schedule. We've been amending their schedule as we go along. They went from 1 hour to about 3 hours of school work. Will probably increase next week to 4 and then five as needed. 5 is the max we're going for if this is stretched out for another 4 weeks. They're learning how to do laundry, cook, yard work, and use zoom.
 
My son is home from SDSU and is an angel. My dd has gone missing. Escaped to some private beach. How do you lock them up?
 
can't say i've shadowed my 12 yr old while at school, but i highly doubt there's as much giggling as i've heard the last couple weeks
 

focused1

BRONZE
Hah, my kid isn't nearly as lucky. She's not in a public school, and her school has classes via Zoom on the exact same schedule as they do when they are in regular session. Same amount of hours and work for her. She's feeling persecuted:D
 

dk_b

SILVER ELITE
We started off good, clocking in about 5 hours per day beginning of the week. Now it is down to just 2 hours a day. Discipline is waning. Anyone else have this problem?
I read a post a week ago from someone who home-schools and has an ed background. She said that the actual "school time" when home-schooled is much less than what non-home-schoolers would expect. If I can find the post, I will post here. I found it helpful and reassuring.
 

dk_b

SILVER ELITE
Hah, my kid isn't nearly as lucky. She's not in a public school, and her school has classes via Zoom on the exact same schedule as they do when they are in regular session. Same amount of hours and work for her. She's feeling persecuted:D
That's really interesting. My kids are in a public school district in the Bay Area. The students from a really diverse socio-economic range and it makes it hard for things to be "mandatory" since not everyone has the same technology (the district is trying to hand out chrome books), internet access (the community is trying for free- or low-cost internet) and work space (many kids take care of younger siblings or grandparents or even ill parents when at home so their only time to be "be students" is when they are actually at school or in the library (closed, of course)). It is a real dilemma (my sister's child does not face the same thing as his school is more homogenous so it is easier to ID the kids who need extra support).

In the coming weeks, they need to figure things out, at least for the high schoolers (one of my kids is a Sr), since they do need to do SOMETHING.
 
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