Game Recording

Pirates1

BRONZE
Does anyone know of a DIY sports recording system? I saw one on here a while back.
 
Alright, here is my super-cheap ass camera set up. I still can't figure out why a "system" sells for $1,500+.

  1. You'll need a tripod. This was $69.95 and is 14 feet tall. https://www.seaportdigital.com/13-5-heavy-duty-air-cushioned-light-stand.html#review-form. Sure, there are taller options, but to me, anything above 10 feet gives a solid perspective. Especially if you play any of your games in a stadium setting. Just head for the top row and you don't even need to extend.
  2. You'll need a tripod head that attaches your camera to your tripod. $25. Tripod Head
  3. You'll need a camera. I found a sony cx440 brand new on Ebay for $156.
  4. You'll need a monitor so that you can see what the camera sees. This was $49 on amazon 7" monitor
  5. To be able to zoom the camera, I bought this remote: Remote with 9' cable (the camera is bluetooth enabled and does have a phone app as an option. But when I tried it, there was too much lag time). My set up does not allow you to tilt the camera while in use. I set the tripod head at an angle it leave it there. You miss some of the near field throw ins once in a while
  6. You'll need a HDMI cable to run from the camera to the monitor. 15' Micro HDMI
  7. You'll also need a power source for the monitor. I just use a portable phone charger with a USB.

These are the basics of what you need. You'll probably want to mount the monitor to something. I just use an Ipad holder (Ipad Holder)mounted to the tripod frame. I recently picked up this clamp/arm that make this easy. Mount Arm

So you are "all in" for less than $400. In order to follow the action, I just rotate the pole of the tripod. It's not always super smooth, but it gets the job done.

I do think that I will upgrade the monitor to something larger at some point this year. That may require me to upgrade the power source.

I just picked up "Power Director" software for video editing. It's a bit advanced for what I am currently doing, but it's been kinda fun to learn. No reason you can't use iMovie or the included editor on Windows if you just want to put the footage up on youtube.
 

ChrisD

SILVER
After years in Marketing , I made my own set up and posted it on here a few times, what Tim has is perfect , no need to spend thousands! On a side note a few weeks ago a person sold on facebook marketplace a 3500 system for 1200, so always shop around.
I also use Imovie and its perfect and free and apple offers free class's...
 

Pirates1

BRONZE
Alright, here is my super-cheap ass camera set up. I still can't figure out why a "system" sells for $1,500+.

  1. You'll need a tripod. This was $69.95 and is 14 feet tall. https://www.seaportdigital.com/13-5-heavy-duty-air-cushioned-light-stand.html#review-form. Sure, there are taller options, but to me, anything above 10 feet gives a solid perspective. Especially if you play any of your games in a stadium setting. Just head for the top row and you don't even need to extend.
  2. You'll need a tripod head that attaches your camera to your tripod. $25. Tripod Head
  3. You'll need a camera. I found a sony cx440 brand new on Ebay for $156.
  4. You'll need a monitor so that you can see what the camera sees. This was $49 on amazon 7" monitor
  5. To be able to zoom the camera, I bought this remote: Remote with 9' cable (the camera is bluetooth enabled and does have a phone app as an option. But when I tried it, there was too much lag time). My set up does not allow you to tilt the camera while in use. I set the tripod head at an angle it leave it there. You miss some of the near field throw ins once in a while
  6. You'll need a HDMI cable to run from the camera to the monitor. 15' Micro HDMI
  7. You'll also need a power source for the monitor. I just use a portable phone charger with a USB.

These are the basics of what you need. You'll probably want to mount the monitor to something. I just use an Ipad holder (Ipad Holder)mounted to the tripod frame. I recently picked up this clamp/arm that make this easy. Mount Arm

So you are "all in" for less than $400. In order to follow the action, I just rotate the pole of the tripod. It's not always super smooth, but it gets the job done.

I do think that I will upgrade the monitor to something larger at some point this year. That may require me to upgrade the power source.

I just picked up "Power Director" software for video editing. It's a bit advanced for what I am currently doing, but it's been kinda fun to learn. No reason you can't use iMovie or the included editor on Windows if you just want to put the footage up on youtube.

That sounds perfect thank you. I already have some of the stuff on your list.

Time to get it all together now!
 

Giesbock

SILVER ELITE
Couple ideas:

if you’re trying to capture full game footage start to finish, the mast rig is the best solution. (Assuming you cant hire a pro cameraman on a platform)

I think all DA games and some DPL games are recorded and accessible on Hudl.

if you’re focused on a single player, there are some cool GPS tracking bundles. As far as I understand it, you’ll have a single, long tracking shot of the target player. Tough to go through to pick out the good moments...

Here’s a different approach:

1. Get a Canon Vixia Camera and Mount it to a decent, 6’ telescoping Manfrotto monopod.

2. Roam the touch lines and end lines, thinking about where your kid is playing, and where the sun is. (Best angle with sun at your back)...

3. track your subject in the viewfinder, and unfortunately, for this to work, you’ll miss much of the peripheral action. Cue off your subject. When he or she perks up, jumps, changes direction or puts on a burst of speed, that’s when you START to record him or her. Try to track ahead, so the subject is at the “back” half of the frame. When that burst of action is over, STOP recording.

Maybe nothing happened. Or, maybe you’re lucky and captured your kid making an impact on the game.

Repeat as required!

By game’s end you might have dozens of short clips...

Later at home, go through the clips quickly and dump the bad stuff.

Name and save the good clips and have fun re-living moments of soccer that otherwise would be gone forever!

Hope this helps.
 
Some advice from experience -- Watch the game through the camera. My wife and I tried to record some games but when things got really exciting sometimes all the recording held was the sound of excited cheers and pictures of our feet.
 

mirage

GOLD
One of my buddies bought the Soloshot3 self tracking video system for recording his kids soccer.

The player has to wear a tracker but that's it.


I've seen the footage from it and it pretty good. He said as long as you don't shoot close up (zoomed in too much) it works wonderfully. When zoomed in too close, the video head moves too much and has trouble keeping the player in frame. Assuming that its for recruiting video, its better to show more field movements with and without the ball, and opponents in the view so don't believe its a problem.
 
I have to say HUDL for basketball is pretty amazing. Daughter has been playing varsity basketball as a freshman and I'm able to see her clips of rebounds, steals, turnovers, points, and assists as it has an option to select individual players. Each game is videoed with an Ipad, uploaded to HUDL, they do the rest of the work. Game available 24 hours after upload. Even gives stats.

Having said that, anyone ever use it for soccer? I'm also not sure what the cost of their service is, and not sure what it provides.
 

Emma

SILVER ELITE
One of my buddies bought the Soloshot3 self tracking video system for recording his kids soccer.

The player has to wear a tracker but that's it.


I've seen the footage from it and it pretty good. He said as long as you don't shoot close up (zoomed in too much) it works wonderfully. When zoomed in too close, the video head moves too much and has trouble keeping the player in frame. Assuming that its for recruiting video, its better to show more field movements with and without the ball, and opponents in the view so don't believe its a problem.
What happens when your child is subbed out? Does it record the bench?

It's funny but a serious question because I'd prefer for it to continue recording for the rest of the team to view too.
 
What happens when your child is subbed out? Does it record the bench?

It's funny but a serious question because I'd prefer for it to continue recording for the rest of the team to view too.
I think it is a good idea to record as much of the action as possible all the time. That might mean planting the camera high up behind one of the goals. You can zoom in on interesting bits later.
 

NickName

SILVER
I think it is a good idea to record as much of the action as possible all the time. That might mean planting the camera high up behind one of the goals. You can zoom in on interesting bits later.
My first setup was a GoPro on a mast behind one (our I think) goal. I ended up moving it to one corner at some point. It was decent but zooming in after the fact (electronically) gets fuzzy fast.

I ended up with a sideline mast mounted system for ~$1200 all in plus a later replacement camera. It works decent for full game footage. Nothing professional but I find it kind of fun to film and edit after the fact.
Like Timbuck, I have Power Director. overkill and after a couple years I still haven’t (or really tried) to unlock its potential.
 
This past Saturday I had to use the Bluetooth to my phone option for a monitor.
I broke the end off of my 15’ hdmi cable.
It works “ok” but the phone is to small to be able to see well. I didn’t use the zoom function because of this.
But good to have as a backup in case of emergency.
 

outside!

PREMIER
Some advice from experience -- Watch the game through the camera. My wife and I tried to record some games but when things got really exciting sometimes all the recording held was the sound of excited cheers and pictures of our feet.
I would offer the opposite advice, based on years of experience. I sight over the top of the camera and point it where I am looking. It makes it much easier to track high balls since I point the camera at where the ball is going to land instead of inducing viewer nausea by trying to follow the high ball. It also is much easier to see the game and anticipate what is going to happen. I have only "lost" the ball a handfull of times when I was zoomed in too close. You should almost never zoom in closer than about 1/3 of the field in order to be able to tell what is happening in the game. I also stop the video anytime the ball goes out of play, which tends to break up the video into easily viewed clips. I shoot with a DSLR only because I already had one. I would recommend using a real video camera instead of a DSLR. I started out doing photos but switched over to shooting video because the newer camera had the feature and I discovered it is usually better. I still shoot photos occasionally when the light is really good, but the last time I did that I shot over 1400 photos in one game. An elevated rig does give a better view, but I like the fact that my rig is just a small camera bag and a monopod.
 
This may be a little much, but, it is my new solution. I happen to need these things for my everyday work life. I like watching my son play and don't want to sit behind a lens. This year, I came up with a crafty way fo my 11 year daughter to make some money paying her $30 a game. I get video of my kid and the team gets video as well. Here is the setup,

  • Edelkrone head (https://www.edelkrone.com/products/headone)
  • Go Pro Max shooting at 6K (5.6k actual)
  • Both the Go Pro and the Head are controlled by an iPhone/iPad
  • And a monopod that will be strapped to the font leg of our easy up.
The 6K from the GoPro will allow you to zoom "in post" pretty close with no loss in quality/sharpness presuming that you are exporting to 1080p - To outside!'s point above, this will give you your 1/3 of the field. Caveat, though...6K footage makes HUGE file sizes so cards and storage becomes a concern. Extra batteries will be needed for a full 90 minute game, and you will need a usb power pack for the iPhone and iPad (iPhone controls the Head, iPad is used as a viewing monitor through the GoPro app). Also, you will need to learn how to edit using proxies in Premiere, Final Cut, etc, unless you have an absolute beast of a computer to edit with. I have tested the workflow using 720p proxies in Premiere on my 2018 Macbook Pro and it works. I will be testing it on the field after state cup at the practices and will post links some footage.
 
Alright, here is my super-cheap ass camera set up. I still can't figure out why a "system" sells for $1,500+.

  1. You'll need a tripod. This was $69.95 and is 14 feet tall. https://www.seaportdigital.com/13-5-heavy-duty-air-cushioned-light-stand.html#review-form. Sure, there are taller options, but to me, anything above 10 feet gives a solid perspective. Especially if you play any of your games in a stadium setting. Just head for the top row and you don't even need to extend.
  2. You'll need a tripod head that attaches your camera to your tripod. $25. Tripod Head
  3. You'll need a camera. I found a sony cx440 brand new on Ebay for $156.
  4. You'll need a monitor so that you can see what the camera sees. This was $49 on amazon 7" monitor
  5. To be able to zoom the camera, I bought this remote: Remote with 9' cable (the camera is bluetooth enabled and does have a phone app as an option. But when I tried it, there was too much lag time). My set up does not allow you to tilt the camera while in use. I set the tripod head at an angle it leave it there. You miss some of the near field throw ins once in a while
  6. You'll need a HDMI cable to run from the camera to the monitor. 15' Micro HDMI
  7. You'll also need a power source for the monitor. I just use a portable phone charger with a USB.

These are the basics of what you need. You'll probably want to mount the monitor to something. I just use an Ipad holder (Ipad Holder)mounted to the tripod frame. I recently picked up this clamp/arm that make this easy. Mount Arm

So you are "all in" for less than $400. In order to follow the action, I just rotate the pole of the tripod. It's not always super smooth, but it gets the job done.

I do think that I will upgrade the monitor to something larger at some point this year. That may require me to upgrade the power source.

I just picked up "Power Director" software for video editing. It's a bit advanced for what I am currently doing, but it's been kinda fun to learn. No reason you can't use iMovie or the included editor on Windows if you just want to put the footage up on youtube.
This is a great list. I built a similar setup, and added #8 to live-stream away games for parents who couldn't make it:

1. Tripod: Velbon Videomate 607 (Small 6 foot for travel ease - works in stadiums fine - not great for field level recording)
2. Head: Velbon Vel-flo 9 (Bought used with tripod on eBay for $35 - mainly bc of the great reviews of the head)
3. Camera: Sony CX 455 (Bought $250 refurbished)
4. Field Monitor: Carnetix ($50 or so - not recommended and looking to replace)
5. Zoom: Don't use. Set to catch 70% of the field and just pan/tilt
6. Basic Amazon 6' cables
7. Power: 2 USB banks since camera, monitor and livestream box need power
8. Epiphan X2 Webcaster ($300) "one touch" box to livestream to Youtube or Facebook

I only livestream, so no editing experience at all.

I have since become interested in all in one solutions (camera that auto follows ball and pans/scans/zooms on its own) that can be plugged into the Webcaster. I have found 3: Veo, Spiideo and Traceup. Veo can't (raw footage must be uploaded and stitched together), Spiideo is pro level overkill/expensive, but the Traceup looks cool as hell if it works.

Does anyone have experience with Traceup? They list a bunch of DA/ECNL level clubs that use them, but their website is pretty sparse (Trace Up). It's expensive but adds a bunch of features (individual player tracking, automatic editing and compiling of clips) that are pretty cool and may be worth it to parents to chip in.
 
We used it also. Worked well enough and the individual tracking was nice but I know some of the parents griped about the price. We did get a little spoiled with the quality of the DA videos, but it did not have the tracking option.
 
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