Fixing the Schedule?

SDMama

BRONZE
I think there was a discussion thread a while back that asked the question, “What would you do to fix youth soccer?“

Is there any chance the powers that be (U.S. Youth Soccer and/or U.S. Club Soccer?) could use this COVID19 “break” to come together for the good of youth soccer to make changes like not allowing tryouts to take place before the end of the season state/national cup tournaments, limiting the number of tournaments a team could play in a seasonal year, ...? (It seems to me that this break will be long enough that they could create a new “normal.”

Realistically, what changes should and could be made coming out of this long break to benefit youth soccer?

Start with what would be the easiest change with the most positive impact, and then go from there.
 

SDMama

BRONZE
I should have used a different thread title. Something like, “Can the COVID19 Break Be Used to Fix Youth Soccer?” (The schedule of having tryouts before state and national cup was what got me thinking about this.)
 
I’m seeing some real value in this slower pace of life and have definitely been evaluating the necessity of club level sports. I think that if we didn’t have them but kids could hangout there would be a return to kids playing sports on their own in the park of out of necessity and pure boredom and what a wonderful thing that would be. Maybe the answer is somewhere in the middle.

I would like to hope this may invoke a reset of sorts in youth sports and/or US Soccer but I think that’s optimistic.
 
One big change should be coach and DOC accountability to parents and players. There is a big power differential and along with that comes abuse of power. When something is not right and there is no recourse or accountability it is not a good system. There should be a legitimate organization or system where complaints can be sent to an objective entity that has some authority to investigate and issue fines. Right now, as has been said many times on this forum, if a parent expresses a legitimate concern or issue and the club doesn’t like it they can blackball players, trash talk players and families and threaten or actually do put in efforts to ruin your good reputation and the player’s future. Children should not be treated like indentured servants and parents should not be bullied into paying exhorbitant amounts of money for a poor quality product. The truly excellent coaches and clubs should be able to flourish and the others should end their reign of power. This system should go both ways and when parents are abusive and destructive they should be reported and investigated by this objective entity and should be subject to fines and consequences also for their abusive and destructive behaviors.
 
1. I would 100% change the birth year and get all the girls back playing together with their school age friends. They will all be together when they go play college.
2. No more middleman coaches who say they are the way, the truth and the true developer to the D1 coach or YNT List.
3. Less travel and zero pressure if a player does not want to travel to New Jersey to be scouted by East Coast colleges
4. Make Socal the Mega of youth soccer by staying here way more, like all the time. Maybe have one showcase and then options for others who love to fly all over the counry looking for soccer games. Travel is 90% unnecessary for us in SoCal and Nocal. Stay in Cali and bring AZ and Vegas into our family. A little road trip to Vegas, Nocal or AZ is ok with me. Plus, the teams are really good imho. Let the other out of state teams come here to play the top goats, not the other way around.
5. Agree with @Soccer43
6. No more lying by coaches
7. More affordable and with better coaching
8. Unity at the youth level with all leagues. Rules, recruiting guidelines and regulation is a must
9. True competition
10. Support HS Soccer
 
#2 is an interesting topic -we have had middle men that were toxic poison and we have had middle men that were true golden angels. If it is the right middle man that is honest and has your player’s best interests at heart it can be a gift. If it is a demon in disguise it can be a curse.
 
#2 is an interesting topic -we have had middle men that were toxic poison and we have had middle men that were true golden angels. If it is the right middle man that is honest and has your player’s best interests at heart it can be a gift. If it is a demon in disguise it can be a curse.
Middleman with a demon is really bad for all involved except for the man possessed by demon. We have an angel coach today for my precious angel girl. Healthy guide to a very complex college recruiting that is about to take place June 15th. Slow down everyone unless the dream school and coach come calling with a great deal for both parties. A true marriage takes some courting. Phone date and then commit for 4 years is not wise.
 

outside!

PREMIER
1. I would 100% change the birth year and get all the girls back playing together with their school age friends. They will all be together when they go play college.
2. No more middleman coaches who say they are the way, the truth and the true developer to the D1 coach or YNT List.
3. Less travel and zero pressure if a player does not want to travel to New Jersey to be scouted by East Coast colleges
4. Make Socal the Mega of youth soccer by staying here way more, like all the time. Maybe have one showcase and then options for others who love to fly all over the counry looking for soccer games. Travel is 90% unnecessary for us in SoCal and Nocal. Stay in Cali and bring AZ and Vegas into our family. A little road trip to Vegas, Nocal or AZ is ok with me. Plus, the teams are really good imho. Let the other out of state teams come here to play the top goats, not the other way around.
5. Agree with @Soccer43
6. No more lying by coaches
7. More affordable and with better coaching
8. Unity at the youth level with all leagues. Rules, recruiting guidelines and regulation is a must
9. True competition
10. Support HS Soccer
1. Agree
2. Soccer43 has a good point
3. Agree!
4. Agree!
5. Agree!
6. See #8
7. I don't have a problem paying for good coaching at the higher levels but there does need to be a limit.
8. Have the entire system be TEAM based. This would end the monopoly power of clubs and leagues like DA/ECNL and prevent clubs from protecting bad/abusive coaches. It would allow a good coach to build a good team that could challenge anyone. The old National League motto "Earn Your Place" is a good idea. Bad coaches would be weeded/relegated out by parents. Clubs would compete for the good coaches.
9. Agree!
10. Have HS soccer be an integral part of development for all players since it would give lower level players a chance to play with older/higher level players and put high level players in a position of leadership. Schools would compete for good coaches.
 
1. Agree
2. Soccer43 has a good point
3. Agree!
4. Agree!
5. Agree!
6. See #8
7. I don't have a problem paying for good coaching at the higher levels but there does need to be a limit.
8. Have the entire system be TEAM based. This would end the monopoly power of clubs and leagues like DA/ECNL and prevent clubs from protecting bad/abusive coaches. It would allow a good coach to build a good team that could challenge anyone. The old National League motto "Earn Your Place" is a good idea. Bad coaches would be weeded/relegated out by parents. Clubs would compete for the good coaches.
9. Agree!
10. Have HS soccer be an integral part of development for all players since it would give lower level players a chance to play with older/higher level players and put high level players in a position of leadership. Schools would compete for good coaches.
I agree with everything you just wrote :)
 
What about a geographic zone for clubs. Like little league. Maybe at least for U-15 and under? Kids play in their communities. Reduce the craziness of recruiting and all star teams and kids driving an hour to practice. If you really want to reduce the business focus of clubs, this would really help.

For those that say their isn't a "decent" club in my area, I would argue there probably is, but even if you don't think so there likely will be if more of your community stays and plays versus driving to play.
 

EOTL

GOLD
1. I would 100% change the birth year and get all the girls back playing together with their school age friends. They will all be together when they go play college.
2. No more middleman coaches who say they are the way, the truth and the true developer to the D1 coach or YNT List.
3. Less travel and zero pressure if a player does not want to travel to New Jersey to be scouted by East Coast colleges
4. Make Socal the Mega of youth soccer by staying here way more, like all the time. Maybe have one showcase and then options for others who love to fly all over the counry looking for soccer games. Travel is 90% unnecessary for us in SoCal and Nocal. Stay in Cali and bring AZ and Vegas into our family. A little road trip to Vegas, Nocal or AZ is ok with me. Plus, the teams are really good imho. Let the other out of state teams come here to play the top goats, not the other way around.
5. Agree with @Soccer43
6. No more lying by coaches
7. More affordable and with better coaching
8. Unity at the youth level with all leagues. Rules, recruiting guidelines and regulation is a must
9. True competition
10. Support HS Soccer
1. No. As stupid as it was the first time they changed it, doing it again repeats the same problem of busting up current teams and friends.
2. Expecting incompetent people to be better people is futile. Parents who are deceived by a soccer coach or club that overstates their ability or has the wrong intentions have only themselves to blame.
3. Yes. If Oregon, Minnesota, Missouri and Nevada lack sufficient quality players and clubs to allow elite players to reach their potential, that is not SoCal’s problem to fix.
4. See #3. If clubs in weaker regions want better competition, go where it exists. Remember the real Surf Cup?
5. See #2. It is a waste of time complaining that other people aren’t doing what they should. The reality is that the people who are complaining are the ones not doing what they should, namely putting their own kid in the right situation for them. This problem usually arises because youth girls soccer is expensive, yet people want the Rolls Royce coach at Yugo prices. Then they complain when they get what they paid for.
6. See above.
7. No. See above. Great coaching and great access to college coaches is a valuable commodity. Telling professionals they just need to be cheaper because you don’t want to pay what they deserve is more than a little offensive. If your kid’s soccer coach doesn’t justify what you are paying, do what you would do with any other professional or supplier, which is find one who does. If that person doesn’t exist at your price point, the problem is your price point, not the system. That said, soccer certainly can be less expensive if your dollars go to those who deserve it (the coach and club) instead of the Marriott and American Airlines. In other words, USSF and the GDA are the cost problem, not the clubs.
8. No. “Recruiting guidelines” is just code for weaker clubs trying to prevent kids from doing what is best for the kid. “Recruiting guidelines” allow weaker clubs to keep their best kids hostage, rather than allowing them to go to better clubs with better training where they belong and want to be. If a club doesn’t want to lose its best players, be a better club. If a parent doesn’t want his daughter’s best teammates going to another club, too bad you don’t get to dictate that other people to do just because you think that’s best for your kid.
9. I don’t know what this means, other than it is the opposite of what you want in #8.
10. If you don’t want your kid to play HS soccer, great. If you do want them to play HS, also great. Just don’t tell anyone else what they can’t do. The hatred of HS soccer stems from two main sources. First, USSF is stupid. It believes that taking all the fun out of the sport and the main reason most kids play the sport - which is to actually play it - and replacing it with 11 months of constant training and very few games makes better soccer players. The reality is that kids decide what motivates them to play the sport, and that varies by kid. If HS glory keeps them playing and enjoying the sport, that is good for soccer and makes them a better player. Or maybe it just makes them a better person because future soccer greatness just isn’t that big a deal to them and there are many better and more beneficial things to do in life. It is mind-boggling stupid for anyone to think that a 12-13 year old girl wants to forego the one thing that makes soccer fun - playing it - based on some vague notion that doing hardly anything besides training 4 days a week, every week, for the next 6 years might be the difference between being a UCLA soccer player and just a student there.

The other source of hatred of HS soccer typically comes from parents whose kids are borderline college material, so they get all freaky that losing their daughter’s best teammates from training for a couple months will jeopardize their own kid’s development and a chance to play at a middling DI program instead of (gasp) just being a student. Too f**king bad. Hire a personal trainer if it’s such a big deal. Also consider that your daughter might benefit long-term from a couple months of HS glory playing in front of hundreds of her peers, rather than playing a couple GDA games in front of 5 parents and maybe a couple college scouts from schools who are probably bad fits anyway.
 

outside!

PREMIER
What about a geographic zone for clubs. Like little league. Maybe at least for U-15 and under? Kids play in their communities. Reduce the craziness of recruiting and all star teams and kids driving an hour to practice. If you really want to reduce the business focus of clubs, this would really help.

For those that say their isn't a "decent" club in my area, I would argue there probably is, but even if you don't think so there likely will be if more of your community stays and plays versus driving to play.
Not a bad idea, but I would push the age limit lower, especially for girls who mature sooner. When a team has one or two players that are significantly better than the rest of the team too many bad habits develop. The great players become ball hogs and the players behind the development curve lose confidence and touches. If the top divisions were limited in number of teams and teams had to earn a spot in the top division, driving for "all-star" teams would decrease anyway.
 
1. No. As stupid as it was the first time they changed it, doing it again repeats the same problem of busting up current teams and friends.
2. Expecting incompetent people to be better people is futile. Parents who are deceived by a soccer coach or club that overstates their ability or has the wrong intentions have only themselves to blame.
3. Yes. If Oregon, Minnesota, Missouri and Nevada lack sufficient quality players and clubs to allow elite players to reach their potential, that is not SoCal’s problem to fix.
4. See #3. If clubs in weaker regions want better competition, go where it exists. Remember the real Surf Cup?
5. See #2. It is a waste of time complaining that other people aren’t doing what they should. The reality is that the people who are complaining are the ones not doing what they should, namely putting their own kid in the right situation for them. This problem usually arises because youth girls soccer is expensive, yet people want the Rolls Royce coach at Yugo prices. Then they complain when they get what they paid for.
6. See above.
7. No. See above. Great coaching and great access to college coaches is a valuable commodity. Telling professionals they just need to be cheaper because you don’t want to pay what they deserve is more than a little offensive. If your kid’s soccer coach doesn’t justify what you are paying, do what you would do with any other professional or supplier, which is find one who does. If that person doesn’t exist at your price point, the problem is your price point, not the system. That said, soccer certainly can be less expensive if your dollars go to those who deserve it (the coach and club) instead of the Marriott and American Airlines. In other words, USSF and the GDA are the cost problem, not the clubs.
8. No. “Recruiting guidelines” is just code for weaker clubs trying to prevent kids from doing what is best for the kid. “Recruiting guidelines” allow weaker clubs to keep their best kids hostage, rather than allowing them to go to better clubs with better training where they belong and want to be. If a club doesn’t want to lose its best players, be a better club. If a parent doesn’t want his daughter’s best teammates going to another club, too bad you don’t get to dictate that other people to do just because you think that’s best for your kid.
9. I don’t know what this means, other than it is the opposite of what you want in #8.
10. If you don’t want your kid to play HS soccer, great. If you do want them to play HS, also great. Just don’t tell anyone else what they can’t do. The hatred of HS soccer stems from two main sources. First, USSF is stupid. It believes that taking all the fun out of the sport and the main reason most kids play the sport - which is to actually play it - and replacing it with 11 months of constant training and very few games makes better soccer players. The reality is that kids decide what motivates them to play the sport, and that varies by kid. If HS glory keeps them playing and enjoying the sport, that is good for soccer and makes them a better player. Or maybe it just makes them a better person because future soccer greatness just isn’t that big a deal to them and there are many better and more beneficial things to do in life. It is mind-boggling stupid for anyone to think that a 12-13 year old girl wants to forego the one thing that makes soccer fun - playing it - based on some vague notion that doing hardly anything besides training 4 days a week, every week, for the next 6 years might be the difference between being a UCLA soccer player and just a student there.

The other source of hatred of HS soccer typically comes from parents whose kids are borderline college material, so they get all freaky that losing their daughter’s best teammates from training for a couple months will jeopardize their own kid’s development and a chance to play at a middling DI program instead of (gasp) just being a student. Too f**king bad. Hire a personal trainer if it’s such a big deal. Also consider that your daughter might benefit long-term from a couple months of HS glory playing in front of hundreds of her peers, rather than playing a couple GDA games in front of 5 parents and maybe a couple college scouts from schools who are probably bad fits anyway.
Ouch, but I like that you have opinions.
1. Go back to the real age. Stupid the first time means 100% the stupid needs to be corrected.
2. I disagree. 80% fault of the deceiving company lying and 20% fault of the dumb dad who believed the lie.
5. It's not a waste of time. Are you a coach?
6. Liar liar pants on fire. Lying coaches need to get the heck out of the game bro
7. Way too expensive for the average player. The travel cost is insane dude. I'm more than willing to pay $3,000 a year for a good coach, but not all the fear teaching
8. Recruiting is a mess, clean it up
HS Soccer rules!!!
 

MacDre

GOLD
I think all soccer should be free/nominal fee until 12-14 years old. Afterwards, there should be fully funded development programs for GOATS sponsored by NWSL teams.

All other kids should play H.S. for a nominal fee.

Liga MX is putting their money where their mouth is. Prior to the break, they essentially made all their U17’ & U15’s the B & C team. So now the B & C teams practice, travel, and play the same schedule as the first team.
Liga MX also mandates that U17’s get a minimum of 1000 first team minutes each tournament.
5CE0BB08-C45E-448B-998F-799E4299E9D2.jpeg1B76DBD7-CDC9-4DBE-A78D-22E82FA21C11.jpeg
 
1. No. As stupid as it was the first time they changed it, doing it again repeats the same problem of busting up current teams and friends.
2. Expecting incompetent people to be better people is futile. Parents who are deceived by a soccer coach or club that overstates their ability or has the wrong intentions have only themselves to blame.
3. Yes. If Oregon, Minnesota, Missouri and Nevada lack sufficient quality players and clubs to allow elite players to reach their potential, that is not SoCal’s problem to fix.
4. See #3. If clubs in weaker regions want better competition, go where it exists. Remember the real Surf Cup?
5. See #2. It is a waste of time complaining that other people aren’t doing what they should. The reality is that the people who are complaining are the ones not doing what they should, namely putting their own kid in the right situation for them. This problem usually arises because youth girls soccer is expensive, yet people want the Rolls Royce coach at Yugo prices. Then they complain when they get what they paid for.
6. See above.
7. No. See above. Great coaching and great access to college coaches is a valuable commodity. Telling professionals they just need to be cheaper because you don’t want to pay what they deserve is more than a little offensive. If your kid’s soccer coach doesn’t justify what you are paying, do what you would do with any other professional or supplier, which is find one who does. If that person doesn’t exist at your price point, the problem is your price point, not the system. That said, soccer certainly can be less expensive if your dollars go to those who deserve it (the coach and club) instead of the Marriott and American Airlines. In other words, USSF and the GDA are the cost problem, not the clubs.
8. No. “Recruiting guidelines” is just code for weaker clubs trying to prevent kids from doing what is best for the kid. “Recruiting guidelines” allow weaker clubs to keep their best kids hostage, rather than allowing them to go to better clubs with better training where they belong and want to be. If a club doesn’t want to lose its best players, be a better club. If a parent doesn’t want his daughter’s best teammates going to another club, too bad you don’t get to dictate that other people to do just because you think that’s best for your kid.
9. I don’t know what this means, other than it is the opposite of what you want in #8.
10. If you don’t want your kid to play HS soccer, great. If you do want them to play HS, also great. Just don’t tell anyone else what they can’t do. The hatred of HS soccer stems from two main sources. First, USSF is stupid. It believes that taking all the fun out of the sport and the main reason most kids play the sport - which is to actually play it - and replacing it with 11 months of constant training and very few games makes better soccer players. The reality is that kids decide what motivates them to play the sport, and that varies by kid. If HS glory keeps them playing and enjoying the sport, that is good for soccer and makes them a better player. Or maybe it just makes them a better person because future soccer greatness just isn’t that big a deal to them and there are many better and more beneficial things to do in life. It is mind-boggling stupid for anyone to think that a 12-13 year old girl wants to forego the one thing that makes soccer fun - playing it - based on some vague notion that doing hardly anything besides training 4 days a week, every week, for the next 6 years might be the difference between being a UCLA soccer player and just a student there.

The other source of hatred of HS soccer typically comes from parents whose kids are borderline college material, so they get all freaky that losing their daughter’s best teammates from training for a couple months will jeopardize their own kid’s development and a chance to play at a middling DI program instead of (gasp) just being a student. Too f**king bad. Hire a personal trainer if it’s such a big deal. Also consider that your daughter might benefit long-term from a couple months of HS glory playing in front of hundreds of her peers, rather than playing a couple GDA games in front of 5 parents and maybe a couple college scouts from schools who are probably bad fits anyway.
You miss the point on why some players and parents don't like HS soccer. First if you kid happens to be play at a high level the quality of most HS training and games is poor in comparison. The amount of practices and games jammed into a very short season allows no time for recovery which is one of the most important and overlooked needs for players. The season is an injury fest also. On the positive side you get to play with HS friends and you are playing for the glory of your HS. Also top players usually get time playing other positions than what they usually play in club. As parents no one sees your kid play club but everyone goes to HS games. Your kid even gets in the paper. So HS soccer really feeds parent's egos a lot more than club.

All three of my kids played HS soccer for varying lengths. My opinion is if their career ends after HS or they just want to have fun then play. If they are going D1 then they are better off just training during the HS season and allowing their bodies to get some rest. I also firmly believe it would be healthier for all soccer players over the age of 14 to not play more than one game per week. Training 4-5 days is fine if one of those days is a recovery day and every player has a routine that include ACL prevention exercises. I also support the 21st Century Model that will spread College soccer over two seasons and limit games to once per week.
 

EOTL

GOLD
You miss the point on why some players and parents don't like HS soccer. First if you kid happens to be play at a high level the quality of most HS training and games is poor in comparison. The amount of practices and games jammed into a very short season allows no time for recovery which is one of the most important and overlooked needs for players. The season is an injury fest also. On the positive side you get to play with HS friends and you are playing for the glory of your HS. Also top players usually get time playing other positions than what they usually play in club. As parents no one sees your kid play club but everyone goes to HS games. Your kid even gets in the paper. So HS soccer really feeds parent's egos a lot more than club.

All three of my kids played HS soccer for varying lengths. My opinion is if their career ends after HS or they just want to have fun then play. If they are going D1 then they are better off just training during the HS season and allowing their bodies to get some rest. I also firmly believe it would be healthier for all soccer players over the age of 14 to not play more than one game per week. Training 4-5 days is fine if one of those days is a recovery day and every player has a routine that include ACL prevention exercises. I also support the 21st Century Model that will spread College soccer over two seasons and limit games to once per week.
Actually I don’t miss the point, but before we
get to that I want to make sure you know I’m End of the Line, especially if you want to circle back around to ACLs.

Like I said earlier, if you don’t want to play HS soccer, great. I don’t care whether anyone else’s kid wants to play HS or not. Maybe HS was not the right thing for your kids, but it is not true for many.

My beef on this issue is with parents and USSF trying to tell me that HS is bad for mine, because I know for certain and based on personal knowledge that is ridiculously stupid and wrong for my kid. The mistake you and USSF make is that you think there’s a one-size-fits all way to make great soccer players although kids, coaches, clubs and high schools come in all different shapes, sizes, abilities and circumstances. Literally every single generalization you made about HS is wrong in the case of my kid and multitudes of others. The world is much bigger and varied than the land of Mark Fuhrman, thank god.

The other mistake you make, and the reason you miss the point, is you’re (poorly) arguing about how to make great soccer players when I don’t give a s**t about that. My only concern is making a better person.
 
So HS soccer really feeds parent's egos a lot more than club.
How about feed the ego of the player? I promise I don;t walk around campus with my chest out and chips on my shoulder chirping. I will say it's super fun for me and my wife to sit with other parents and cheer on our Beach Breakers. I will also say I get way more excited as a fan when the Breakers take on the Cougars of Capo Valley then when the OC Strikers take on the LA Breakers, especially when I had to drive up to North Hollywood on Saturday that took 6 hours away from surfing. EOTL has a great take on this, who cares!!!!!
 
How about feed the ego of the player? I promise I don;t walk around campus with my chest out and chips on my shoulder chirping. I will say it's super fun for me and my wife to sit with other parents and cheer on our Beach Breakers. I will also say I get way more excited as a fan when the Breakers take on the Cougars of Capo Valley then when the OC Strikers take on the LA Breakers, especially when I had to drive up to North Hollywood on Saturday that took 6 hours away from surfing. EOTL has a great take on this, who cares!!!!!
Why is it more fun for me as a parent? Ganas, pure ganas from the players. They all care way more and are happy to be playing for their school. It's fun for them and if girls aren;t having fun, they will find fun somewhere else. If I gave my goat a choice, 3rd Street Promenade with your friends or soccer game and hang out with pops all day Saturday what you think she would pick? How about your own dd? Let's get real folks......16 year old girls who have been playing soccer since they were 5, aren;t too excited to drive up to Santa Monica to go play in a big league game. You can see it on so many of their faces. BURN OUT!!!!
 
Some good suggestions above, but US Soccer has much bigger problems to solve right now. One, the lawsuit. Two, the likely cancellation of all soccer through the summer--this includes the NWSL season and likely the MLS season as well (unless MLS has venues for an abbreviated Fall season, but then will compete with the NFL). (As I'm typing I see that NPSL just cancelled their season, so it's starting already.) Three, how to prep and re-tryout players for the 2021 olympics.

You should all start prepping your mindsets (and your kids') too that there will not be team/club soccer this summer--Aug. 1 if we're lucky. Social distancing requirements will be with us for a while and you can't play team sports without contact.

Last, we all should be teaching our kids that this is a great example how soccer (and all sports) are expendable. That's why school and a purpose beyond sport should be their #1 focus growing up.
 

MacDre

GOLD
You miss the point on why some players and parents don't like HS soccer. First if you kid happens to be play at a high level the quality of most HS training and games is poor in comparison. The amount of practices and games jammed into a very short season allows no time for recovery which is one of the most important and overlooked needs for players. The season is an injury fest also. On the positive side you get to play with HS friends and you are playing for the glory of your HS. Also top players usually get time playing other positions than what they usually play in club. As parents no one sees your kid play club but everyone goes to HS games. Your kid even gets in the paper. So HS soccer really feeds parent's egos a lot more than club.

All three of my kids played HS soccer for varying lengths. My opinion is if their career ends after HS or they just want to have fun then play. If they are going D1 then they are better off just training during the HS season and allowing their bodies to get some rest. I also firmly believe it would be healthier for all soccer players over the age of 14 to not play more than one game per week. Training 4-5 days is fine if one of those days is a recovery day and every player has a routine that include ACL prevention exercises. I also support the 21st Century Model that will spread College soccer over two seasons and limit games to once per week.
If the goal is college soccer and to reduce risk of ACL injuries, I think the best route is to be a multi sport high school athlete and strength train.
I think college soccer is about athleticism and is not very technical due to constant pressing. A multi sport high school athlete that strength trains WILL be more athletic than most club soccer players and less susceptible to injury due to the variation in training. And more prepared to excel at college soccer.
 
Top